Lyrical Genius

Factual Errors In Pop-music

Singers are known to sometimes incorporate strange lyrics in their songs and while they claim it’s for poetic reasons, they’re sometimes just wrong. Here are some examples of wrong facts in songs.

Thunder

According to Fleetwood Mac, you’ll only hear thunder when it’s raining. Thunder is the sound caused by lightning-bolts, whose high temperature and pressure expands the air around itself. This expansion causes a shock wave, which is what you hear.

Lightning is an electrical discharge. It’s most common when clouds gain an electrical charge and yes, in this case it’s common for there to also be rain. There are, however, also other ways for lightning to occur. Volcanic eruptions for instance can also cause lightning strikes. Lightning is not even limited to our moist little planet. Venus, Jupiter and Saturn are all known to have lightning occur. Venus has no rainfall, except for sulphuric acid raining in the upper atmosphere. Lightning on Venus is most likely caused by volcanic activity.

Gorilla Loving

Think it’s romantic to tell a girl you want to make love to her like Gorillas? Even though female gorillas choose their mate, in groups with multiple males female gorillas can be forced to mate with multiple males during her period. I don’t think many women will go for that even after the alcohol and cocaine combo Bruno Mars talks about doing.

Asian Bicycles

In a Katie Melua song it is said that it’s a fact that there are 9.000.000 bicycles in Beijing. Beijing is a large city with a population of 12.46 million people. Bikes are extremely popular in China, where about 37% of the population owns a bike. So saying that there are 9.000.000 bikes in Beijing is good guess. If 37% of the population own a bike, then there are 4.610.200 bikes in Beijing. This might not be 9.000.000 bikes, but it is a fair assumption that in a major city bike use is higher than in the countryside. Having said that, it is definitely not a fact, but an estimate.

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